Some are saying so—but is it true? And should it affect your strategy?

One of the hot topics lately is whether Facebook is doing down the tubes. There was the study that predicted it would lose 80% of its users by 2017, there are a number of blog posts wondering how much longer it’s going to be dominant with niche users getting more and more active on other platforms, and of course there’s always been the yuppie hobbie of complaining loudly about how terrible Facebook is (on Facebook).

A few things to consider:

  1. Facebook is still the biggest social network, by a million miles. (You can’t count Google+’s numbers; more people are using it but the stats are still wildly inflated.) Even if it were dying, it would take forever to die.
  2. Facebook is still the only social network that allows you to do everything—text, pictures, video, post links, etc. And since everybody’s always adapting, there’s no telling what changes it could make to become cool again tomorrow.
  3. On the other hand, this topic is a good reminder not to put all your eggs in one basket—on ZERO social networks do you own your followers’ information; if any of them go out of business you’re in trouble. Even “capturing” email addresses is of limited value, because people can give you spam-catcher ones they don’t really use, or change them and forget to tell you. Ultimately, the core of using any communications method in nonprofit operations is to maintain a relationship with a person—and in a healthy relationship, you know more than one way to get in touch with them (and they remember to tell you when they move). What are you doing to build a relationship of mutual value with somebody, across multiple platforms?

Comment